23 Most Rare Succulents
& Where to Buy them!

Are you wondering about what succulents are the hardest to find out there? Keep reading to find out more!

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Jimena Bolívar

August 02, 2021


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Introduction

Succulents come in a range of different shapes and sizes. The most beautiful ones are often the most difficult to find in the wild. Are you curious to find out more? Look no further because we have prepared a list for you!

Some of these are Othonna Capensis, Pachyphytum Compactum, Conophytum subglobosum, Baseball plant, Graptoveria, Plover eggs, Aloe helenae and Discocactus.

What are the Most Rare Succulents?

Name of Succulent Scientific name
Ruby necklace Othonna Capensis
Little Jewel Pachyphytum Compactum
Living pebbles Conophytum subglobosum
Seven Stars Cactus Ariocarpus Trigonus
Paper Spine Cactus Tephrocactus Articulatus
Baseball plant Euphorbia obesa
Calico Hearts Adromischus Maculatus
Blue Rose Echeveria Echeveria X Imbricata
Mexican Hens and Chicks Echeveria elegans
Plover Eggs Adromischus cooperi
Crinkle Leaf Plant Adromischus cristatus
Pebbled Tiger Jaws Faucaria Tuberculosa
Graptoveria Graptoveria ‘Debbi’
Haworthia-leaved Aloe Aloe Haworthioides
Star Window plant Haworthia Cuspidata variegata
Horse’s Teeth Haworthia Haworthia Truncata v. maughanii
Purple Moon cactus Gymnocalycium friedrichii
Sand Dollar cactus Astrophytum asterias
Pelotilla de Chinamada Monanthes wildpretii
Vahondranda Aloe helenae
Estevesia Estevesia alex-bragae
Parodia Parodia rechensis
Discocactus Discocactus subterraneo-proliferans

1. Othonna Capensis

An image of ruby necklace

  • Scientific name: Othonna Capensis
  • Native to: South Africa
  • Family: Asteraceae
  • Genus: Crassothonna
  • Plant Type: succulent
  • Soil pH: 6.0-6.5
  • Hardiness: 10°F - 50°F and USDA zone 8a to 10b

Othonna Capensis, commonly known as ruby necklace and little pickles covers a lot of ground area. It belongs to the family, Asteraceae and requires a few hours of sunlight everyday. 

PRO-TIP

Make sure to use a well-draining type of soil mix

2. Pachyphytum Compactum

An image of pachyphytum compactum

  • Scientific name: Pachyphytum compactum f. variegata
  • Native to: Mexico
  • Family: Crassulaceae
  • Genus: Pachyphytum
  • Plant Type: succulent
  • Soil pH: 5.7 - 6.3
  • Hardiness: 20°F - 50°F and USDA zone 9a to 11b

Commonly known as Little Jewels, this succulent is popular for its characteristic rosettes and bright colors. It has pointy tips which turn violet during spring. It is a very sensitive succulent and requires a lot of care during the winter. 

3. Conophytum subglobosum

An image of conophytum

  • Scientific name: Conophytum truncatum
  • Native to: South Africa
  •  Family: Aizoaceae
  •  Genus: Conophytum
  • Plant Type: succulent
  • Soil pH: 5.6 - 6.0 
  • Hardiness: to -2°C

Conophytum subglobosum, commonly known  as Living pebbles, often sprouts ivory white flowers in full bloom. This type of succulent grows gradually over a period of time. Their habitat include mosses. 

4. Ariocarpus Trigonus

An image of the Seven star cactus

  • Scientific name: Ariocarpus retusus subsp. trigonus
  • Native to: Mexico
  • Family: Cactaceae
  • Genus: Ariocarpus
  • Plant Type: succulent
  • Soil pH: 7.0 - 8.0
  • Hardiness: 25°F - 50°F and USDA zone 9b to 11b

Ariocarpus Trigonus, commonly known as the Seven Star cactus, forms rosettes in the shape of stars like its name suggests. Yellow flowers sprout over a course of time when all of its needs are met. It can easily be cultivated with a mixture of well-drained soil. 

5. Tephrocactus Articulatus

An image of the Paper Spine Cactus

  • Scientific name: Tephrocactus articulatus
  • Native to: Argentina
  • Family: Cactaceae
  • Genus: Tephrocactus
  • Plant Type: cactus
  • Soil pH: 6.1 - 7.8
  • Hardiness: greater than 30°F and USDA zone 8b to 10b

Tephrocactus articulatus, commonly known as the Paper Spine cactus, belongs to the family, Cactaceae. White flowers sprout from the stem. This type of plant requires a few hours of direct sunlight. It can easily be propagated through leaf cuttings. 

6. Baseball plant

An image of the baseball plant

  • Scientific name: Euphorbia obesa
  • Native to: South Africa
  • Family: Euphorbiaceae
  • Genus: Euphorbia
  • Plant Type: succulent
  • Soil pH: 6.0 - 7.0
  • Hardiness: USDA zone 10 to 11

Euphorbia obesa, commonly known as the Baseball plant, does not require much to be harvested. You have to be careful with overwatering this plant. Small flowers appear around the stem after it is taken care of properly. 

7. Adromischus maculatus

An image of Calico Hearts

  • Scientific name: Adromischus maculatus
  • Native to: South Africa
  • Family: Crassulaceae
  • Genus: Adromischus
  • Plant Type: succulent
  • Soil pH: 5.0 - 7.0
  • Hardiness: 25°F - 50°F and USDA zone 9b to 11b

Adromischus maculatus, commonly known as Calico Hearts, are popular for the pattern on their stems and leaves. This succulent can easily be grown indoors. It thrives in extreme heat and a few hours of direct sunlight. 

8. Echeveria X Imbricata

An image of Blue rose echeveria

  • Scientific name: Echeveria X Imbricata
  • Native to: Mexico
  • Family: Crassulaceae
  • Genus: Echeveria
  • Plant Type: succulent
  • Soil pH: slightly acidic
  • Hardiness: USDA zone 9 - 12

Echeveria X Imbricata, commonly known as Blue Rose Echeveria, forms rosettes of bluish green leaves just like its name suggests. It requires direct exposure to bright sunlight. It can even tolerate the cold during winter months. 

9. Echeveria Elegans

An image of echeveria elegans

  • Scientific name: Echeveria elegans
  • Native to: Mexico
  • Family: Crassulaceae
  • Genus: Echeveria
  • Plant Type: cactus
  • Soil pH: 6.0
  • Hardiness: 20°F - 50°F and USDA zone 9a to 11b

Echeveria elegans, commonly known as Mexican Hens and Chicks and Mexican snowball, forms small rosettes of beautiful green leaves. Pink flowers sprout from the stem during the right season. It can easily be grown in a well-drained soil mixture. 

10. Plover Eggs

An image of plover eggs

  • Scientific name: Adromischus cooperi
  • Native to: South Africa
  • Family: Crassulaceae
  • Genus: Adromischus
  • Plant Type: succulent
  • Soil pH: 6.0
  • Hardiness: 25°F - 50°F and USDA zone 9a to 11b

Adromischus cooperi, commonly known as Plover Eggs, has distinctive red patterns on its leaves that resemble plover eggs. When the plant reaches full maturation, a lot of small flowers sprout from the stem. It requires a lot of water and a good fertilizer. 

11. Crinkle Leaf plant

An image of crinkle leaf plant

  • Scientific name: Adromischus cristatus
  • Native to: South Africa
  • Family: Crassulaceae
  • Genus: Adromischus
  • Plant Type: succulent
  • Soil pH: 6.1 - 6.5
  • Hardiness: 25°F - 35°F and USDA zone 9b to 10b

Adromischus cristatus, commonly known as the Crinkle Leaf Plant, requires partial to full sun exposure to reach its maximum potential. Reddish white flowers sprout from the stem. It requires to be planted during the spring.

12. Pebbled Tiger  Jaws

An image of pebbled tiger jaws

  • Scientific name: Faucaria tuberculosa
  • Native to: South Africa
  • Family: Aizoaceae
  • Genus: Faucaria
  • Plant Type: succulent
  • Soil pH: 6.6 - 8.4
  • Hardiness: 25°F - 50°F and USDA zone 9b to 11b

Faucaria tuberculosa, commonly known as Pebbled Tiger Jaws, has distinctive jaw-like leaves. It requires full exposure to the sun. It is can survive in any type of soil and is relatively easier to grow than most succulents.

13. Graptoveria

An image of graptoveria

  • Scientific name: Graptoveria ‘Debbi’
  • Native to: Mexico
  • Family: Echeveria
  • Genus: Graptopetalum
  • Plant Type: succulent
  • Soil pH: 6.5 - 6.8
  • Hardiness: USDA zone 9 to 11

Graptoveria ‘Debbi’, is the product of two succulent species, Echeveria and Graptopetalum. It needs full exposure to sunlight to reach its maximum height. 

PRO-TIP

Place Graptoveria in the morning sun to avoid sunburn

14. Haworthia-leaved Aloe

An image of Haworthia-leaved Aloe

  • Scientific name: Aloe Haworthioides
  • Native to: Madagascar
  • Family: Asphodelaceae
  • Genus: Aloe
  • Plant Type: cactus
  • Soil pH: 6.1 - 6.5
  • Hardiness: 25°F and USDA zone 9b

Aloe Haworthioides, commonly known as Haworthia-leaved Aloe, forms rosettes of narrow leaves. It is a slow-growing plant and requires bright light. 

15. Star Window plant

An image of Star window plant

  • Scientific name: Haworthia Cuspidata Variegata
  • Native to: South Africa
  • Family: Asphodelaceae
  • Genus: Haworthia
  • Plant Type: cactus
  • Soil pH: 5.0 - 7.0
  • Hardiness: 30°F - 50°F and USDA zone 10a to 11b

Haworthia Cuspidata variegata, commonly known as the Star Window plant, forms rosettes of bright green leaves. White flowers sprout from the stem. This plant requires partial shade.

16. Horse’s Teeth Haworthia

An image of Horse's teeth haworthia

  • Scientific name: Haworthia Truncate v. Maughanii
  • Native to: South Africa
  • Family: Asphodelaceae
  • Genus: Haworthia
  • Plant Type: cactus
  • Soil pH: 6.1 - 6.5
  • Hardiness: 30°F and USDA zone 10 to 11

Haworthia Truncate v. Maughanii, commonly known as Horse’s Teeth Haworthia, is a small succulent that sprouts small white flowers from its stem. This plant requires only a few hours of direct sunlight. 

17. Purple Moon cactus

An image of purple moon cactus

  • Scientific name: Gymnocalycium mihanovichii
  • Native to: South America
  • Family: Cactaceae
  • Genus: Gymnocalycium
  • Plant Type: Herbaceous perennial
  • Soil pH: 5.1 - 5.5
  • Hardiness: 50°F and USDA zones 11 to 12

Gymnocalycium mihanovichii, commonly known as Purple Moon cactus, has a beautiful purple appearance. It requires a few hours of bright direct sunlight. It thrives in a mixture of well-drained soil.

18. Sand Dollar cactus

An image of the sand dollar cactus

  • Scientific name: Astrophytum asterias
  • Native to: Texas and Mexico
  • Family: Cactaceae
  • Genus: Astrophytum
  • Plant Type: cactus
  • Soil pH: 7.0 - 8.0
  • Hardiness: USDA zone 8 to 9

Astrophytum asterias, commonly known as the Sand Dollar cactus, is a spineless cactus belonging to the plant family, Cactaceae. It is a slow-growing houseplant.  It does not require much water. 

19. Pelotilla de Chinamada

An image of Monanthes

  • Scientific name: Monanthes wildpretii
  • Native to: Canary Islands, Tenerife
  • Family: Crassulaceae
  • Genus: Monanthes
  • Plant Type: cactus
  • Soil pH: 6.1 - 6.5
  • Hardiness: 40°F - 50°F and USDA zone 9 to 11

Monanthes wildpretii, commonly known as Pelotilla de Chinamada, belongs to the genus of small succulents that are native to the Canary Islands in Tenerife. It is one of the most hardest to find succulents out there.

20. Aloe Helenae

An image of Aloe helenae

  • Scientific name: Aloe helenae
  • Native to: Madagascar
  • Family: Asphodelaceae
  • Genus: Aloe
  • Plant Type: cactus
  • Soil pH: 7.0 - 8.5
  • Hardiness: 30°F and USDA zone 10a

Aloe helenae, commonly known as Vahondranda, belongs to the popular plant genus, Aloe. It requires a few hours of full sun exposure. It can grow up to 13 feet tall.

21. Estevesia

An image of estevesia

  • Scientific name: Estevesia alex-bragae
  • Native to: Brazil
  • Family: Cactaceae
  • Genus: Estevesia
  • Plant Type: cactus
  • Soil pH: 5.7 - 5.8

Estevesia alex-bragae, commonly known as Estevesia, is one of the most rarest succulents out there. It is an endangered cactus native to Brazil. Not much has been discovered about this plant.

22. Parodia

An image of Parodia

  • Scientific name: Parodia rechensis
  • Native to: Brazil
  • Family: Cactaceae
  • Genus: Parodia
  • Plant Type: cactus
  • Soil pH: Acidic
  • Hardiness: USDA zone 10 to 12

Parodia rechensis, commonly known as Parodia, is a very rare cactus that is native to Brazil. It thrives in extreme heat and direct sunlight. 

23. Discocactus

An image of Discocactus

  • Scientific name: Discocactus subterraneo-proliferans
  • Native to: Brazil
  • Family: Cactaceae
  • Genus: Discocactus
  • Plant Type: cactus
  • Soil pH: Acidic

Discocactus subterraneo-proliferans, commonly known as Discocactus, belongs to the family, Cactaceae. It requires full exposure to the sun. It does not require much water. 

Where to Buy them

These succulents are so rare that you can find them on only a very few websites. These are the following:

  1. Mountain Crest Gardens

  2. Simply Succulents

But I would also recommend checking out the Amazon Succulent page. Every day the succulents sold on Amazon are getting better and better. So it’s always worth a shot!

Conclusion

We have looked at the 23 most rare succulents and where to buy them. Some of these were the Purple moon cactus, Parodia, Aloe Haworthioides, and Discocactus.

If you liked reading about succulents, go ahead and check out our post about the largest succulents.

43 Largest Succulents in the World! [Specimens & Species]

Succulents are generally known to be small and cute, but you'll be surprised to see that they can usually outgrow the expectations!

Jimena Bolívar Picture

By Jimena Bolívar

Easy Succulents Founder

My name is Jimena and I'm the the founder of Easy Succulents! I'm fascinated by this wonderful plants and I want to share with the world everything I know about them!

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Jimena Bolívar Picture

Jimena Bolívar

Easy Succulents Founder

My name is Jimena and I'm the the founder of Easy Succulents! I'm fascinated by this wonderful plants and I want to share with the world everything I know about them!

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