23 Beautiful Fuzzy Succulents.
I'm in love with number 14!

Aren't fuzzy succulents just the cutest cacti out there? We've listed 23 Beautiful Fuzzy Succulents down for you!

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Jimena Bolívar

June 06, 2021


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Introduction

The most fascinating succulents out there are the fuzzy succulents. With the velvety texture of their leaves, they almost look unreal. Their thick and hairy leaves make them the center of attention wherever you spot them.

23 of the most beautiful fuzzy succulents are Smith’s Giant Houseleek, Tree of Love, Gouty Houseleek, Bearded Leaved Crassula, Jersey Pigmyweed, Crassula sericea, Hairy Cushion Crassula, Lizard Skin, Woolly Crassula, Cocoon Plant, Conchita Escarlata, Ruby Blush, White Chenille Plant, Bear’s Paw, Red Echeveria, Mexican Firecracker, Woolly Rose Plant, Firecracker Plant, Chocolate Soldier, Snow White Panda Plant, Silver Teaspoons, Stonecrop and Cobweb Hen and Chick.

Name of succulent Scientific name
Smith’s Giant Houseleek Aeonium smithii
Tree of Love Aichryson laxum
Gouty Houseleek Aichryson tortuosum
Bearded Leaved Crassula Crassula barbata
Jersey Pigmyweed Crassula pubescens
Crassula sericea Crassula sericea
Hairy Cushion Crassula Crassula setulose
Lizard Skin Crassula tecta
Woolly Crassula Crassula tomentosa
Cocoon Plant Senecio haworthii
Conchita Escarlata Echeveria coccinea
Ruby Blush Echeveria Pulvinata v. Ruby
White Chenille Plant Echeveria pulvinata var. frigida
Bear’s Paw Cotyledon tomentosa
Red Echeveria Echeveria harmsii
Mexican Firecracker Echeveria setosa
Woolly Rose Plant Echeveria ‘Doris Taylor
Firecracker Plant Echeveria setosa var. Deminuta
Chocolate Soldier Kalanchoe tomentosa
Snow White Panda Plant Kalanchoe eriophylla
Silver Teaspoons Kalanchoe bracteate
Stonecrop Sedum mocinianum
Cobweb Hen and Chick Sempervivum arachnoideum

1. Smith’s Giant Houseleek

An image of a Smith’s Giant Houseleek

Scientific name: Aeonium smithii Native to: island of Tenerife, Canary Islands Family: Crassulaceae Genus: Aeonium Plant Type: flowering plant Soil pH: 6.1 to 6.5 Hardiness: USDA zones 9b to 11b (25 °F to 50 °F)

These shrublets are quite distinct from its other aeonium counterparts, with its thin yet firm leaves adorned with short magenta strokes across their underside.

These drought-tolerant plants have bright yellow flowers that bloom during the mid spring and early summer.

They germinate in gelatin, agar, and other similar viscous conditions. Do not cover seeds with soil. After germination, they preferably require a sandy loam, since they need moisture.

They are monocarpic, which means they die after flowering.

2. Tree of Love

An image of a Tree of love

Scientific name: Aichryson laxum Native to: Canary Islands Family: Crassulaceae Genus: Aichryson Plant Type: flowering plant Soil pH: 6.1 to 6.5 Hardiness: USDA zones 9b to 12b (25 °F to 60 °F)

These succulents look like small trees. You could trick your friends into believing they are bonsais, but in reality they don’t take nearly as much effort to nurture! They adapt well to different environments, unless you’re trying to get them to flower.

Their bright yellow flowers require very specific conditions to bloom. Use very little fertilizer, because too much may encourage overflowing and eventually die.

As they are excellent pot plants, keep them inside in a moderately cool area with the occasional sunlight. Be sure to trim them if they get too large.

3. Gouty Houseleek

An image of a Gouty houseleek

Scientific name: Aichryson tortuosum Native to: Canary Islands Family: Crassulaceae Genus: Aichryson Plant Type: flowering plant Soil pH: 6.1 to 6.5 Hardiness: USDA zones 9b to 11b (25 °F to 50 °F)

You can identify them by the beautiful purple-red tinge on the edges of their green leaves. They have very dense branches, often hairy and garbled at the base.

Provide them a well-drained soil mixture in the first repotting, following the soak-and-dry method to avoid overwatering. Propagate them by cuttings and seeds. You will find them blooming beautiful star-shaped flowers during spring-time.

Note that these plants do not handle the cold very well and prefer a lot of sun. Overwatering can kill them. The outdoors are an ideal thriving environment for them. Unless you live in a cold place, then keep them indoors.

4. Bearded Leaved Crassula

An image of a crassula barbata

Scientific name: Crassula barbata Native to: South Africa Family: Crassulaceae Genus: Crassula Plant Type: flowering plant Soil pH: 6.1 to 6.5 Hardiness: none required

These succulents are extremely hairy and don’t require an expert to be identified. Think Santa Claus, but as a plant and usually for the summer. They may bear cute pink flowers in the spring if healthy. For a classier look in your yard, place them within a rock garden.

When you bring them home, look for any cuts in the leaves as they may get infected by fungi. Treat those cuts with fungicide.

They should always be repotted in dry mineral soil, and very gently. Like most succulents, the soak-and-dry method is the best way to water them. Make sure their soil drains well, as overwatering can kill them. They grow well outdoors, but if you keep them inside then make sure they get a lot of direct sunlight. Bearded Leave Crassulas cannot handle cold weather.

In order to propagate this succulent, you need to cut a leaf and wait a few days for it to become callous. Then plant them and ensure the soil is slightly damp at all times.

5. Jersey Pigmyweed

An image of a crassula pubescens

Scientific name: Crassula pubescens Native to: South Africa Family: Crassulaceae Genus: Crassula Plant Type: succulent Soil pH: 5.0 to 7.5 Hardiness: USDA zones 9b to 11b (25 °F to 50 °F)

If you ever want to see a plant blush, the Jersey Pigmyweed is a live example, but only during the winter. Place it in the sun and their cute little fingers will turn a blazing shade of red. These shrubby, fuzzy succulents bloom for months with a flurry of white flowers that smell delightful. It’s a truly gorgeous sight in the winter, but they remain green through the warmer months.

They require moderate care and sometimes need to be treated for mealy bugs and fungal diseases. Just like the other succulents, overwatering is dangerous.

The Jersey Pigmyweed usually spreads out like a mat, so it’s best to plant them outdoors where they have room to grow. If you want to keep them indoors, your pot should be shallow and wide with an assortment of small rocks over the soil. The bedrock will stabilize them and keep them upright.

A single leaf is enough to use for propagation. They need to be placed within a dish of succulent or cacti mix, and then covered until they sprout.

6. Crassula sericea

An image of a crassula sericea

Scientific name: Crassula sericea Native to: South Africa and Namibia Family: Crassulaceae Genus: Crassula Plant Type: succulent Soil pH: 6.0 Hardiness: USDA zones 10b to 11b (35 °F to 50 °F)

These piles of bulbous, curvaceous pyramids are hard to ignore. They often create a consistent pattern as they grow upwards, and produce long stalks with tiny white bouquets that are too cute to forget.

They may flatten if not given a good amount of water, but overwatering should still be avoided. As long as their soil is kept damp, they will be safe from over-swelling. This is extremely important to keep in mind as they are used to a shallow soil mixture and a thin layer of bedrock for support.

Growing them outdoors is best as they prefer warmer climates. They require strong sunlight. For indoor use, be careful of the material of the pot used to make sure they grow well. During the spring, it may bloom with white flowers.

7. Hairy Cushion Crassula

An image of a crassula setulosa

Scientific name: Crassula setulosa Native to: Mozambique, South Africa, Zimbabwe Family: Crassulaceae Genus: Crassula Plant Type: succulent Soil pH: 5.0 to 7.5 Hardiness: Higher than USDA zone 6

The name might intimidate you. Admittedly, they look a little intimidating as well. If you’re a fan of alien species from outer space, the look of this plant will interest you. They often grow in a haphazard cluster into a dense mat, with irregular patches of red and green across the surface. There is quite a lot of hair on them as well.

Risk of root rot is high, which is why they require a shallow bed of soil. Overwatering should be avoided. They can bear some frost, but ideally prefer warmer temperatures with partial to full sunlight. They are spring bloomers and do well indoors and outside with the right conditions.

Note that they are prone to mealy bugs and fungal diseases since they like to spread out, and should be monitored for their health with a keen eye.

8. Lizard Skin

An image of a Lizard skin plant

Scientific name: Crassula tecta Native to: South Africa Family: Crassulaceae Genus: Crassula Plant Type: succulent Soil pH: 5.0 to 7.5 Hardiness: USDA zones 9b to 11b (25 °F to 50 °F)

This beautiful plant blooms radially and forms a rosette, with voluminous thick leaves of various sizes sprouting from the center. With a green-grey color and dotted with dull white, they complement the dark or muted color schemes of minimalist interior design.

Out of all the other succulents, this one is most prone to root-rotting and could die easily if it isn’t taken care of immediately. It needs repotting and root cleaning more often than the others.

Repotting is the most important part to keeping this plant alive. The process will allow you to catch and discard any rotting roots, treat cuts with fungicide, and allow the plant to dry out any moisture. They need to be left completely dry in the new pot for a week or so before adding just a bit of water to reduce root rot.

All lizards enjoy a good sun basking, and your Lizard Skin plant will, too. But never cultivate it in open soil and ensure you tend to it indoors.

9. Woolly Crassula

An image of a Woolly Crassula

Scientific name: Crassula tomentosa Native to: South Africa Family: Crassulaceae Genus: Crassula Plant Type: succulent Soil pH: 6.1 to 6.5 Hardiness: USDA zones 9b to 11b (25 °F to 50 °F)

The fuzzy little leaves on this plant open out on either sides like open clams stuffed into one another. Multiple buds grow together and around each other in clusters and colonies. They’re monocarpic and they flower once in their lifetime and then die. Fortunately, they do set seeds to grow more plants from.

A dry and sunny environment is suitable for these plants, and a lot of their shape relies on good feeding and care. Too much sunlight could hurt them, and so a light shade is preferred.

Although evergreen, their flowers bloom from April to June and are used to rocky habitats, so be sure to use a nice layer of rocks over their soil to add to their aesthetics.

They can be propagated by seeds and leaf cuttings in a well-drained soil mixture. After a one-time repotting from the store, it does not need a change very often.

10. Cocoon Plant

An image of a Cocoon plant

Scientific name: Senecio haworthii Native to: South Africa Family: Asteraceae Genus: Senecio Plant Type: cactus, succulent Soil pH: 6.3 to 6.8 Hardiness: USDA zones 9b to 11b (25 °F to 50 °F)

This succulent is a rare find, and it’s easy to see why. With a frosty gray exterior because of its abundance of wool, the environment needed to achieve the growth of thick and short hair is undeniably difficult. It still takes on a beautiful teal hue should the hair not grow as thick, and is the perfect plant to introduce some coolness into rustic interiors.

It’s long, finger-like petals protrude upwards, clustering within copious branches and forming colonies. With an extreme resistance to drought and dry weather, it survives well without much tending.

Even though it likes to stay hydrated, it can miss the occasional watering. The key is to make sure that even after giving it a soak, the soil does not remain damp for long as it can cause unstable growth of the plant and root rot.

These plants require a good 6 hours of sunlight or their leaves will start to droop, but make sure they are not exposed to scorching heat.

11. Conchita Escarlata

An image of a echeveria coccinea

Scientific name: Echeveria coccinea Native to: Mexico Family: Crassulaceae Genus: Echeveria Plant Type: cactus, succulent Soil pH: 6.0 Hardiness: USDA zone 9b (25 °F)

Often used as ornaments on wedding cakes, this ornamental plant’s hair has a silky sheen to it that puts most conditioner commercials to shame.

In the wild, its wide leaves grow and curl backwards and sideways in elegant waves. They’re much smaller at home, are relatively easy to tend to, and look beautiful in the direct sunlight.

They need good drainage in their pots to prevent root rot and overwatering. Other than that, there isn’t much else one needs to worry about when taking care of them.

12. Ruby Blush

An image of a Ruby Blush plant

Scientific name: Echeveria Pulvinata v. Ruby Native to: Mexico Family: Crassulaceae Genus: Echeveria Plant Type: cactus, succulent Soil pH: 6.0 Hardiness:USDA zones 9b to 11b (25 °F to 50 °F)

They may be small rosettes, but their stems can branch them over 6 inches if given the right environment. With its leaves tapering into an edge and tipped with pinkish-red, they look ethereal under the thin sheen of translucent white fuzz.

One can’t go wrong with the regu;ar soak-and-dry method, but be sure to dry the water out completely between each soak, as a constantly damp soil does not do these plants good.

The good news is that these plants are not monocarpic, so they do not die after they bloom their beautiful array of colorful flowers. They do need pruning, and you will have to keep an eye out for dead leaves to remove or they will sap away at your plant’s nutrients.

Repotting is usually needed towards warmer seasons.

13.White Chenille Plant

An image of a White Chenille plant

Scientific name: Echeveria pulvinata var. frigida Native to: Mexico Family: Crassulaceae Genus: Echeveria Plant Type: cactus, succulent Soil pH: 5.5 to 6.0 Hardiness: USDA zones 9b to 11b (25 °F to 50 °F)

Also known as ‘Frosty’, and it’s obvious why. The dense, short layer of hair over its light green leaves gives a cold and chilly look to the plant. But if it’s put under bright light, one can detect a hint of red at the tips of its leaves. Be careful of placing it in the scorching afternoon sun, as it could hurt its growth.

These plants are perfect for the winter, and bloom flowers that contrast its leaves with brilliant oranges. While these succulents can withstand very cold temperatures, they should still be prevented from freezing over, as it could induce a period of “dormancy” where they stop growing.

Frosty does not need much watering, and it is ideal to let it dry out between each watering session during the summer.

14. Bear’s Paw

An image of a Bear's paw plant

Scientific name: Cotyledon tomentosa Native to: South Africa Family: Crassulaceae Genus: Cotyledon Plant Type: flowering plant Soil pH: 6.1 to 6.5 Hardiness: USDA zone 9b to 11b (70 °F to 80°F)

The Bear’s Paw is one of the cutest succulents on this list, and will easily replace the absence of a furry friend at home. Beware, they can be mildly toxic. You can spot them by their thick leaves with zigzagging at the edges. These edges are tinged a pinkish red.

These plants are fragile, and prefer a shady place within a bright space. Do not provide them direct sunlight or too much water. Place them in a somewhat sandy soil, and ensure it is slightly damp. They do not thrive below 30 °F, and watering them should be avoided during winters as they become dormant.

Growth is active during spring and summer, so fertilize them twice a month. The best way to propagate the Bear’s Paw is by cuttings. They also sprout red or orange flowers when taken care of well!

15. Red Echeveria

An image of a Red echeveria

Scientific name: Echeveria harmsii Native to: Mexico Family: Crassulaceae Genus: Echeveria Plant Type: cactus, succulent Soil pH: 5.6 to 7.8 Hardiness: USDA zone 10b (35 °F to 40°F)

The Red Echeveria is the epitome of royalty and elegance. Its velvety-plush to the touch, and a brilliant hue of red-purple over the edges of its dark green leaves. It grows in perfect rosettes and adds a pop of color to any place.

Although, if your plant is too red then it could mean it’s stressed out. This includes too much sunlight and heat. They’re easily grown in dry and sandy soil with the occasional watering, and in a light shade during the summer. When it’s winter, it should be left alone.

Give your Red Echeveria a rock garden to settle into, and make sure you provide a balanced liquid fertilizer 2 to 3 times when it’s growing.

16. Mexican Firecracker

An image of a Echeveria setosa

Scientific name: Echeveria setosa Native to: Mexico Family: Crassulaceae Genus: Echeveria Plant Type: succulent Soil pH: 6.1 to 6.5 Hardiness: USDA zone 9b to 11b (25 °F to 50°F)

The short, thick, and juicy leaves of the Mexican Firecracker create a dense rosetta that spreads out in a beautiful bloom in the right conditions. It can become upto six inches wide. It’s relatively hairy at the center, but it thins out towards the outer leaves.

It needs a typical soak-and-dry method to thrive without root rot and overwatering. This plant is quite sensitive to temperatures and will not last too long below 30 °F. It does better as an indoor plant, but still requires plenty of sunlight.

When propagating this plant, cut off a leaf and allow it to dry for two days before planting in well-drained soil.

17. Woolly Rose Plant

An image of a Woolly Rose Plant

Scientific name: Echeveria ‘Doris Taylor Native to: Namibia Family: Crassulaceae Genus: Echeveria Plant Type: succulent Soil pH: 5.6 to 7.8 Hardiness: USDA zones 9a to 11b (25 °F to 50°F)

These are tight bundles of rosettes, with a thick spread of short hair across the surface of their leaves. Their pale green color adds to the coolness of the room they’re placed in.

It needs very little water, but does require a full morning’s sun. Be sure to not expose it to harsh sunlight as it could dry up the leaves too soon. Provide it some light shade to maintain its integrity.

During the summers, it may require more water in comparison to colder days. It may need the occasional fertilizer as well. The water should drain out almost immediately, leaving the soil just lightly damp. These plants do well in half potting soil and half coarse sand. You will find orange blossoms pop around somewhere in late spring.

18. Firecracker Plant

An image of a Firecracker plant

Scientific name: Echeveria setosa var. Deminuta Native to: Mexico Family: Crassulaceae Genus: Echeveria Plant Type: succulent Soil pH: 5.6 to 7.8 Hardiness: USDA zone 9b (25 °F to 30°F)

The plants are gorgeous due to its dull pastel undertones that surround the green-grey leaves at the top. In the sunlight, one might mistake them for a kind of fairy fruit. They grow in compact and consistent rosettes where their leaves do not part from its base.

It’s far-fetched from the name it’s been given, until the blooming season arrives. It’s flaming little flowers shoot up a good few inches away with bursts of yellow and orange.

They resist drought quite well, but it’s best not to let them go without water for too long. They still require a full sun and a well-draining soil. That way, they’re extremely low maintenance. Repot them as needed, but ensure it’s during the warmer seasons.

19. Chocolate Soldier

An image of a Kalanchoe tomentosa

Scientific name: Kalanchoe tomentosa Native to: Madagascar Family: Crassulaceae Genus: Kalanchoe Plant Type: succulent Soil pH: 6.0 Hardiness: USDA zone 9b to 11 (60 °F to 75°F)

The pale, fuzzy, long leaves of this plant are dotted along the edge with deep reds that are sure to catch anyone’s attention.

These plants do not prove an issue with humidity, and it can be moved indoors and outdoors as one pleases. It still prefers warmth, yet needs to be shielding when the sun is too hot.

While you may not need to water this plant frequently, it needs a balanced diet of fertilizer with houseplant food at half-strength. Sandy potting soil or a perlite mixture will allow its roots to be safe from rot.

20. Snow White Panda Plant

An image of a Snow White panda plant

Scientific name: Kalanchoe eriophylla Native to: Madagascar Family: Crassulaceae Genus: Kalanchoe Plant Type: succulent Soil pH: 5.0 to 7.0 Hardiness: USDA zones 10a to 11b(30 °F to 50°F)

The Snow White Panda’s fleshy leaves can clump into a mat-forming foliage. It’s still a tender succulent and prone to issues that come with other succulents at its roots. It’s soft to the touch, has a fairy-dust like silver shimmer, and blooms light pink flowers that are white at the center.

In the winter, the leaves turn red. How rich the color is indicates its sensitivity to light. If it starts getting deeper and darker, you might need to give it some shade. During colder temperatures, it needs little water as the growth slows down for dormancy..

During the warmer seasons when it grows, you may need to fertilize it twice a week, or use slow-release pellets to ensure it stays healthy.

21. Silver Teaspoons

An image of a Kalanchoe bracteata

Scientific name: Kalanchoe bracteata Native to: Southeastern Madagascar Family: Crassulaceae Genus: Kalanchoe Plant Type: succulent Soil pH: 5.8 to 6.3 Hardiness: 28°F

These ghostly grey plants look like they popped out of a winter wonderland fantasy. A word of caution: they can be mildly poisonous. Be sure to keep them indoors away from birds, insects, and other animals.

Although they can withstand the cold, temperatures below 55 °F will cause it to die. They prefer the sun, but shade is necessary as the tips of their leaves may burn in intense heat. Place them under trees with moderately dense canopies to allow them an ideal growing environment.

They are sensitive to how much water they receive, and you can keep an eye on their leaves to see when they’re underwatered. You may reduce the watering during the winter, but ensure that their pots drain well during the summers. They thrive well in clay pots.

22. Stonecrop

An image of a Stonecrop

Scientific name: Sedum mocinianum Native to: Mexico Family: Crassulaceae Genus: Sedum Plant Type: Cactus Soil pH: 6 to 7 Hardiness: USDA zone 9b to 11b (25 °F to 50 °F)

The oblong and fleshy petals of this plant are covered in visible and thick strands of hair. These plants need almost no attention at all, and are extremely adaptable to all kinds of conditions. They are called Stonecrop because, like stones, they really need no care or tending to.

March is the best time to plant them. One planting in your yard is enough for it to start a growth of colonies, although curbing its spread within a certain area is encouraged as blooming starts from July through October.

Use the Stonecrops to fill up an empty, boring spot in your garden and enhance the scenery with some small bounders and and colorful rocks.

23. Cobweb Hen and Chick

An image of a Sempervivum arachnoideum

Scientific name: Sempervivum arachnoideum Native to: Southern Europe Family: Crassulaceae Genus: Sempervivum Plant Type: cactus Soil pH: 6 to 8 Hardiness: USDA zones 5b to 8b (-15℉ or -26℃)

These plants can grow with beautiful splashes of deep hues across its leaves. The tones of reds and purples, accompanied by the sheer layer of white hair over the surface, give this plant a spidery feel that could accompany halloween decorations.

While they are drought resistant, it’s best to care for how much water they need. They survive fine in the winter, but the watering should be reduced for their dormancy period.

Their soil needs to be sandy and drain well. One can add compost or gravel to assist with the drainage, but they survive in places where other plants cannot.

Conclusion

We’ve taken a look at 23 of the most beautiful and fuzzy succulents which were Smith’s Giant Houseleek, Tree of Love, Gouty Houseleek, Bearded Leaved Crassula, Jersey Pigmyweed, Crassula sericea, Hairy Cushion Crassula, Lizard Skin, Woolly Crassula, Cocoon Plant, Conchita Escarlata, Ruby Blush, White Chenille Plant, Bear’s Paw, Red Echeveria, Mexican Firecracker, Woolly Rose Plant, Firecracker Plant, Chocolate Soldier, Snow White Panda Plant, Silver Teaspoons, Stonecrop and Cobweb Hen and Chick.

If you’re interested to know more about succulents, feel free to check out our post about cacti plants.

Photo Credits

Smith’s Giant Houseleek - Tree of Love - Gouty Houseleek - Bearded Leaved Crassula - Jersey Pigmyweed - Crassula sericea - Hairy Cushion Crassula - Lizard Skin - Woolly Crassula - Cocoon Plant - Conchita Escarlata - Ruby Blush - White Chenille Plant - Bear's Paw - Red Echeveria - Mexican Firecracker - Woolly Rose Plant - Firecracker Plant - Chocolate Soldier - Snow White Panda Plant - Silver Teaspoons - Stonecrop - Cobweb Hen and Chick

Jimena Bolívar Picture

By Jimena Bolívar

Easy Succulents Founder

My name is Jimena and I'm the the founder of Easy Succulents! I'm fascinated by this wonderful plants and I want to share with the world everything I know about them!

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Jimena Bolívar Picture

Jimena Bolívar

Easy Succulents Founder

My name is Jimena and I'm the the founder of Easy Succulents! I'm fascinated by this wonderful plants and I want to share with the world everything I know about them!

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